Storyteller

Storyteller

Most people would shine a flashlight under their chin when telling scary stories around a campfire, but Tigress thinks she looks spookier lit from the side.

Technical notes: I lowered the contrast to reduce the glare and make her face look a little darker. She’s holding the keychain flashlight herself in her right hand, which is steadier than me holding it and trying to take the photo with one hand.

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Making simple double exposures in Photoshop

I found there’s no simple “just merge two photos together” option in Photoshop, and the File/Automate/Photomerge option hates photos that don’t fit together exactly.

The simplest way I found:
Load both photos into Photoshop.
Click on the Move icon (the four arrows in all directions).
Right-click on the tab of one photo and select Move to New Window. It will minimize slightly.
Drag that photo into the other photo. That creates two layers in the other photo’s frame with full opacity.
Reduce the opacity of each layer so you can see both layers for positioning.
Drag each layer into the position you like, and select the opacities. Full opacity will bring back the original for a layer, and 50% or so will make that layer a ghost image.
Select both layers in the sidebar.
Select Edit/Auto-Blend Layers. You may want to have Seamless checked.
If the settings look good, click Okay, and you should get the blending you want.
You may need to experiment a bit with the steps, but at this point you can do whatever other processing you want, and save.

Double Vision

Double Vision

Rear view mirrors are really two mirrors in one. Unlike regular mirrors, the glass is a wedge with two reflecting surfaces. There’s the normal-looking silvered surface at the back, and the anti-glare surface on the front that reduces light. You flip it when the lights of cars behind you are too bright. You can see both reflections in this photo.

A bonus effect that is worth experimenting with is the clarity of the mirror in contrast with the bokeh of the rest of the image around it, which can be used to enhance the depth of a photo.

Breeze, Light

Breeze, Light

For this week’s FlickrFriday challenge “Second Wind” and Macro Mondays challenge “High Key”.

To get the high key effect, I used the white space of Macro Monday’s discussion of the theme as the background, and used a full-spectrum light on the front of the fan, from off to the right. This really brought out the texture.

Breakdown

Breakdown

Tigress could use a break about now. She may think the situation is ropeless, but all she needs is a little focus.

Depth can be enhanced by having the background lit darker than the foreground.

Photographed for this week’s FlickrFriday and Macro Mondays challenges, “Shot from Above” and “Broken”.

Orb

Frozen World

When you know your camera’s disadvantages, you can use them to your advantage. I’ve found mine has trouble focusing on small bright shiny objects for macros. Too close and it wants me to turn on the flash. Turn on the flash and it won’t focus on the object, or it’ll wash it out.

For this photo I managed to balance all the exceptions to get a spacey science fictiony new agey album/book cover of an orb, slightly out of focus. With the albedo, it looks like it could be a moon of a gas giant.

I used a frosted glass marble on white paper in low lighting with the flash off. No editing was done except for the signature.

Like Clockwork

Like Clockwork

I have to watch my shows.

One way to make a photo more disturbing is to turn it not obviously upside down. Viewers can tell something’s wrong, but they’re not sure what. Other ways are to make it slightly redder and the lighting a bit harsher.