Navajo Nation homes get electricity after years in the dark

Jimmie Long Jr. places the glass on an oil lamp inside his Kaibeto home on the Navajo Reservation in Arizona.

The Navajo Tribal Utility Authority typically connects from 400 to 450 homes a year, chipping away at the 15,000 scattered, rural homes without power on the 27,000-square-mile reservation that lies in Arizona, New Mexico and Utah.

Source: Navajo Nation homes get electricity after years in the dark

Rusty Power

Rusty Power

It sounds like the name of a male dancer, but it’s really the negative charge clamp for my car’s battery. Tricks of the ambient light make the greenish areas look like they’re radioactive and glowing, and the forward bolt look three-dimensional.

Photographed for the Macro Mondays “Rust” and FlickrFriday “Power” challenges on Flickr.

This Bacterium Can Survive on Electricity Alone — NOVA Next | PBS

This Bacterium Can Survive on Electricity Alone — NOVA Next | PBS

In the beginning, scientists thought photosynthesis was the only foundation for life on Earth, and that sunlight was required for the energy that percolated through the food chain.  Then in the 1970s, chemosynthesis was confirmed in life around deep-sea volcanic vents (and more recently, cold seeps).  Now researchers have identified several species of bacteria that get energy directly from energy, or electrosynthesis.  The bacteria feed on electrons, with no intermediary conversions from matter.  Researchers are using batteries in mines to lure electrosynthesizing bacteria so they can culture them and learn how to make bioelectric devices that are cleaner and more efficient than conventional mechanical electricity converters.

electric-bacteria

Geobacter sulfurreducens breathes by transferring electrons to iron oxides found in soil. (From NOVA Next.)