Storyteller

Storyteller

Most people would shine a flashlight under their chin when telling scary stories around a campfire, but Tigress thinks she looks spookier lit from the side.

Technical notes: I lowered the contrast to reduce the glare and make her face look a little darker. She’s holding the keychain flashlight herself in her right hand, which is steadier than me holding it and trying to take the photo with one hand.

Making simple double exposures in Photoshop

I found there’s no simple “just merge two photos together” option in Photoshop, and the File/Automate/Photomerge option hates photos that don’t fit together exactly.

The simplest way I found:
Load both photos into Photoshop.
Click on the Move icon (the four arrows in all directions).
Right-click on the tab of one photo and select Move to New Window. It will minimize slightly.
Drag that photo into the other photo. That creates two layers in the other photo’s frame with full opacity.
Reduce the opacity of each layer so you can see both layers for positioning.
Drag each layer into the position you like, and select the opacities. Full opacity will bring back the original for a layer, and 50% or so will make that layer a ghost image.
Select both layers in the sidebar.
Select Edit/Auto-Blend Layers. You may want to have Seamless checked.
If the settings look good, click Okay, and you should get the blending you want.
You may need to experiment a bit with the steps, but at this point you can do whatever other processing you want, and save.

Double Vision

Double Vision

Rear view mirrors are really two mirrors in one. Unlike regular mirrors, the glass is a wedge with two reflecting surfaces. There’s the normal-looking silvered surface at the back, and the anti-glare surface on the front that reduces light. You flip it when the lights of cars behind you are too bright. You can see both reflections in this photo.

A bonus effect that is worth experimenting with is the clarity of the mirror in contrast with the bokeh of the rest of the image around it, which can be used to enhance the depth of a photo.

Queen for a Day. Monday.

Queen for a Day.  Monday.

Unlike another striped cat, Tigress loves Mondays. They mean she might dress up and pose for a Macro Mondays challenge, which for this week is “Queen”. What’s the point of being an action figure if you don’t get any action? Today she feels like royalty!

For her raiment, she’s chosen a crown with a stunning blue tiger’s eye stone. Because she’s a tiger, and she’s got a good eye for haute couture, which is this week’s FlickrFriday challenge.

This is another successful experiment in depth perception, and the use of a tablet for lighting and effects. I found a stock photo of London to display on the tablet, which is propped just two inches behind Tigress. The brightness of the tablet darkened her front, so I lit her with a full spectrum lamp. When I brightened the photo in Photoshop, the effect of the lamp made the background look like a bright sunlit day, and the bokeh makes it look like a realistic distance behind her.