Long-Simmering Soup at Wattana Panich – Gastro Obscura

Discover Long-Simmering Soup at Wattana Panich in : At a Bangkok bistro, one pot of beef stew has been cooking non-stop for more than 45 years.

Source: Long-Simmering Soup at Wattana Panich – Gastro Obscura

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Barbecue station

Barbecue station

At Tony Ringtail’s 2011 Memorial Day barbecue in West Windsor, NJ.

This setup has everything. Grills, prep tables, coolers, hot pots, ingredients, salsa made on the spot, burgers, grilled veggies, grilled pineapple, shiny utensils and pans, a good arrangement… THIS is a barbecue.

Coyoty makes a pepperoni and blueberry pizza.

Pepperoni and blueberry pizza

If it works for pineapple…

…it doesn’t necessarily work for blueberries. There’s nothing bad about it, but blueberries just don’t hold up as well as pineapple as a topping. Their flavor’s not as strong and they might as well not be there. Maybe they don’t have the sharp acidity that makes pineapple stand out.

I don’t know how they are all facing the same direction. I just tossed them randomly. My strange luck again.

The recipe was simple: Preheat oven to 500° F., oil the pan with avocado oil, spread out the dough, lay the sauce, sprinkle with ground black pepper and green chili flakes, cover with shredded mozzarella, lay the pepperoni, cover with more mozzarella, lay the blueberries, and bake for 10 minutes.

Coyoty makes roasted blackened salmon and pearl onions.


This is one of the tastiest things I’ve cooked. Wild Alaskan sockeye salmon filet, frozen pearl onions, and truffle oil from Trader Joe’s, with Chef Prudhomme’s blackened redfish seasoning.

I laid the filet skin-down on a large foil sheet, drizzled it with truffle oil, covered it with the seasoning, covered it with onions, covered the onions with the seasoning, sealed the foil, and roasted it for 15 minutes at 500 degrees F.

From the first onion, it was heaven. The onions picked up the flavor of the salmon, and vice-versa, in a good way. It would have been great without the seasoning, but the seasoning made it greater. I think the truffle oil made it the greatest. The fish was moist, flaky, and perfectly cooked. I’m making it again tomorrow.

Coyoty makes trashy brown rice with turkey gravy and spicy salami spread.

Sometimes I eat out of a trash can. (Others may call it a multicooker.) If I have things sitting around in the refrigerator that I want to get rid of, but don’t want to just throw it away, I throw it in the trash can with some rice and cook it on the rice’s setting. (Unless it’s something I can have for breakfast, then I use oatmeal instead.) In this case, it turned out really good.

I had 1.5 cups of leftover Trader Joe’s turkey gravy and 3 oz. (half a package) of Trader Joe’s Nduja (a spicy salami spread), threw it in with a cup of Trader Joe’s brown rice, and pressure cooked it for 25 minutes. The result tasted very much like good Cajun dirty rice and beans, but without the beans.

Coyoty makes a green chili cheddar scrambled egg souffle.


I’m not sure if it can be called an actual souffle, but it puffed up like one.

I scrambled two eggs with half-and-half, green chili flakes, Trader Joe’s Every Day Seasoning, and cheddar cheese, and baked it for 15 minutes at 400 degrees in a small Lodge cast iron melting pot. I got a nicely browned puffy omelet with a crispy crust on the bottom. The green chili flakes were the best part. I’ll be making more of these.