Scientists harvest 1st vegetables in Antarctic greenhouse

BERLIN (AP) — Scientists in Antarctica have harvested their first crop of vegetables grown without earth, daylight or pesticides as part of a project designed to help astronauts cultivate fresh food on other planets.

Source: Scientists harvest 1st vegetables in Antarctic greenhouse

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Water clover

Water clover

Marsilea quadrifolia. In Ongley Pond at the White Memorial Conservation Center in Litchfield, CT.

This is a good example for not getting rid of old photos. When I took it, it was a muddy mess and I didn’t have the tools to clean it up. When it came up randomly in a picture picker recently, I ran it through PhotoShop and was able to make it presentable. The hidden detail was surprising.

Magenta roses with hoverflies

Magenta roses with hoverflies

Episyrphus balteatus, also known as the marmalade hoverfly.

At the rose garden in Elizabeth Park in Hartford, CT.

Star-of-Bethlehem

Star-of-Bethlehem

Ornithogalum umbellatum, also known as grass lily, nap-at-noon, and eleven-o’clock lady. Originally a cultivated garden plant, now gone feral in New England.

There are two flowers shown, one open and one closed.

At the Connecticut State Colleges & Universities offices in Hartford, CT.

Skunk cabbage flowers

Symplocarpus foetidus, also known as eastern skunk cabbage, swamp cabbage, clumpfoot cabbage, meadow cabbage, foetid pothos, or polecat weed. In the woods near Legion Pool in the Seymour Land Trust in Seymour, CT.

Looking like pitcher plants, the flowers emerge before the main plant in the spring, and produce a foul odor to attract pollinators. I am definitely not a pollinator.